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dc.contributor.authorEkelund, Ulf
dc.contributor.authorWard, Heather A.
dc.contributor.authorNorat, Teresa
dc.contributor.authorLuan, Jian'an
dc.contributor.authorMay, Anne M.
dc.contributor.authorWeiderpass, Elisabete
dc.contributor.authorSharp, Stephen J.
dc.contributor.authorOvervad, Kim
dc.contributor.authorØstergaard, Jane Nautrup
dc.contributor.authorTjønneland, Anne
dc.contributor.authorJohnsen, Nina Føns
dc.contributor.authorMesrine, Sylvie
dc.contributor.authorFournier, Agnès
dc.contributor.authorFagherazzi, Guy
dc.contributor.authorTrichopoulou, Antonia
dc.contributor.authorLagiou, Pagona
dc.contributor.authorTrichopoulos, Dimitrios
dc.contributor.authorLi, Kuanrong
dc.contributor.authorKaaks, Rudolf
dc.contributor.authorFerrari, Pietro
dc.contributor.authorLicaj, Idlir
dc.contributor.authorJenab, Mazda
dc.contributor.authorBergmann, Manuela
dc.contributor.authorBoeing, Heiner
dc.contributor.authorPalli, Domenico
dc.contributor.authorSieri, Sabina
dc.contributor.authorPanico, Salvatore
dc.contributor.authorTumino, Rosario
dc.contributor.authorVineis, Paolo
dc.contributor.authorPeeters, Petra H.
dc.contributor.authorMonnikhof, Evelyn
dc.contributor.authorBueno-de-Mesquita, H. Bas
dc.contributor.authorQuirós, José Ramón
dc.contributor.authorAgudo, Antonio
dc.contributor.authorSánchez, María-José
dc.contributor.authorHuerta, José-Maria
dc.contributor.authorArdanaz, Eva
dc.contributor.authorArriola, Larraitz
dc.contributor.authorHedblad, Bo
dc.contributor.authorWirfält, Elisabet
dc.contributor.authorSund, Malin
dc.contributor.authorJohansson, Mattias
dc.contributor.authorKey, Timothy J.
dc.contributor.authorTravis, Ruth C.
dc.contributor.authorKhaw, Kay-Tee
dc.contributor.authorBrage, Søren
dc.contributor.authorWareham, Nicholas J.
dc.contributor.authorRiboli, Elio
dc.date.accessioned2016-04-06T07:52:36Z
dc.date.available2016-04-06T07:52:36Z
dc.date.issued2015-01-14
dc.identifier.citationAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutrition. 2015, 101, 613-621.nb_NO
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/11250/2384128
dc.descriptionThis is an open access article distributed under the CC-BY license (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/3.0/).nb_NO
dc.description.abstractBackground: The higher risk of death resulting from excess adiposity may be attenuated by physical activity (PA). However, the theoretical number of deaths reduced by eliminating physical inactivity compared with overall and abdominal obesity remains unclear. Objective: We examined whether overall and abdominal adiposity modified the association between PA and all-cause mortality and estimated the population attributable fraction (PAF) and the years of life gained for these exposures. Design: This was a cohort study in 334,161 European men and women. The mean follow-up time was 12.4 y, corresponding to 4,154,915 person-years. Height, weight, and waist circumference (WC) were measured in the clinic. PA was assessed with a validated self-report instrument. The combined associations between PA, BMI, and WC with mortality were examined with Cox proportional hazards models, stratified by center and age group, and adjusted for sex, education, smoking, and alcohol intake. Center-specific PAF associated with inactivity, body mass index (BMI; in kg/m2) (>30), and WC (≥102 cm for men, ≥88 cm for women) were calculated and combined in random-effects meta-analysis. Life-tables analyses were used to estimate gains in life expectancy for the exposures. Results: Significant interactions (PA × BMI and PA × WC) were observed, so HRs were estimated within BMI and WC strata. The hazards of all-cause mortality were reduced by 16–30% in moderately inactive individuals compared with those categorized as inactive in different strata of BMI and WC. Avoiding all inactivity would theoretically reduce all-cause mortality by 7.35% (95% CI: 5.88%, 8.83%). Corresponding estimates for avoiding obesity (BMI >30) were 3.66% (95% CI: 2.30%, 5.01%). The estimates for avoiding high WC were similar to those for physical inactivity. Conclusion: The greatest reductions in mortality risk were observed between the 2 lowest activity groups across levels of general and abdominal adiposity, which suggests that efforts to encourage even small increases in activity in inactive individuals may be beneficial to public health.nb_NO
dc.language.isoengnb_NO
dc.publisherHighWire Pressnb_NO
dc.subjectcohort studynb_NO
dc.subjectepidemiologynb_NO
dc.subjectobesitynb_NO
dc.subjectphysical activitynb_NO
dc.subjectexercisenb_NO
dc.subjectmortalitynb_NO
dc.subjectpopulation attributable fractionnb_NO
dc.titlePhysical activity and all-cause mortality across levels of overall and abdominal adiposity in European men and women: the European prospective investigation into cancer and nutrition study (EPIC)nb_NO
dc.typeJournal articlenb_NO
dc.typePeer reviewednb_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Medical disciplines: 700nb_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Medical disciplines: 700::Clinical medical disciplines: 750nb_NO
dc.subject.nsiVDP::Medical disciplines: 700::Health sciences: 800nb_NO
dc.source.journalAmerican Journal of Clinical Nutritionnb_NO
dc.identifier.doi10.3945/​ajcn.114.100065
dc.description.localcodeSeksjon for idrettsmedisinske fag / Department of Sports Medicinenb_NO


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